You Can’t Sell A Song In Nashville

2:55 pm

Ever Wonder About Selling A Song?

It’s easy.  Just mail your song to:

City of Nashville
c/o The Song Purchaser 
123 Music Row
Music City, USA

I’m kidding.  Don’t do that.

I want to clear something up for you: There is no such thing as just “selling a song”.

I understand, you’ve painstakingly written this incredible hit song and everyone is telling you how great it is.  You’ve got girls dancing on the bar when you play it.  Now you want to sell the song to a major artist or a publisher here in Nashville.  You’ve heard about this Internet thing and think you can send off a few emails or post it all over Facebook and make $50,000 because Blake Shelton is going to write you a check for this song when he hears it.

It simply doesn’t work like that.  It’s not like manufacturing where you build something tangible and sell it for a profit.

The reason it’s not that simple is complicated to explain but just understand that in Nashville there are thousands of great songwriters who are already here writing great songs for publishers and artists literally everyday.

I’m sorry to burst your bubble but it’s very likely that your song just isn’t that good.  I’m not saying mine are but I will say that everything I had written before moving to Nashville doesn’t hold a candle to the stuff I have written since living in Nashville.

To be a songwriter you have to live, eat, sleep and breathe the craft.  There are so many incredible songwriters here that will inevitably open your mind and make you a better writer.  It’s also partly about who you know.  Sure, you have to have good songs but knowing the right people is what opens those doors to having one of your songs cut by a major artist.  There are many approaches that will get you to where you want to be whether it’s a writing deal or a serendipitous encounter with someone that sets you on the right course.

With the Internet you can certainly build yourself a foundation which will give you more exposure and credibility, and you can pursue certain channels outside of Nashville that will get your songs heard by some of the right people, but actually living here in Nashville is a musical journey that any serious songwriter has to take if they want to improve their chances for success.  You might not have to move here but visit here, stay a week, make friends, go to writers nights.  You have to keep at it. Your bubble will only burst if you have the impression that your song is so good, that anyone who hears it will buy it on the spot.  That just doesn’t happen – it has, I mean, there are stories, but how many times have you played the lottery and hit the jackpot?

In the country market songs are rarely written by the artists.  Taylor Swift is a good example of the exception to that but typically all the creation happens in the big machine that is “country music”.

Around Nashville there are established networks that are in place to keep Joe the songwriter from bombarding executives and artists with crappy songs.  It’s a pretty tight filtration system.  You have to play the game if you want to join the circle.  When you move to Nashville and stick around long enough for people to realize you are a serious writer doors will slowly begin to open.  Think of advertising and how many millions of dollars go into exposing you to a product until you finally remember it and eventually buy it.  It’s the same with songs; the first time someone hears your song they might be distracted or they might not fall in love with it.  So you have to keep playing around town and expose people to your style of writing.  You have to show that you are actually a songwriter and write other good stuff besides that one good one.  Eventually people will begin to recognize you and remember they liked your songs the last time they heard you and they’ll stick around to hear you again.

You’ll meet a lot of smoke blowers and over time you’ll learn how to act around the people who can really open doors for you.  Remember, just because someone has had success in the industry does not mean they can help you.  Your personalities might not match or it might not be the right timing.  Also remember that just because someone has had success does not mean they are rolling in the money – their own professional connections might be dwindling.  Every hit songwriter is searching for their own next big hit so if you do have a great song, they are usually not willing to just introduce you to all their connections.  They’ll likely want to build a relationship with you and help you grow.  If you get signed up under one of the better publishing companies with the stronger connections you are more likely to have your name on the next hit song.  It’s so hard to do this unless you are living here in Nashville for a while.  That’s why songwriters move here.  It takes time.  And it takes a major hit song, or a lot of moderately hit songs to make a living.  Everyone is working hard to make that living.

There are advantages to being with a bigger publisher; they schedule you to write with other great songwriters and when you present them with a good song they will pay to have a demo recorded; with all their major connections they’ll pitch it to be on a major artist’s upcoming album.  There are definitely advantages but if you’re like me – a non-country songwriter – this system is pretty much useless to you.

I’m not in the country market but I see several people who are and I pay attention to their struggles and successes.  If I could write country music I would take my own advice.  I’m taking a different approach with my personal strategy: I record my own music and I am my own artist, I enjoy performing but certainly am trying to become a better writer who gets commercial work.

If you are not going to be just a songwriter and also like to perform then I suggest you take the steps to record your songs here in Nashville; stop making demos and start investing in yourself.  That is the ultimate reason I moved here.  I knew there would be extremely professional musicians, producers and engineers who could capture the sound I wanted for my music, and I knew there would be endless opportunity to grow as a songwriter.

Each of us has our own path but if you are taking the path to being a country music songwriter you are taking the path most traveled, and therefore have a lot of other travelers taking that path with you.  In advertising it’s called “noise”.  However, by taking the country music songwriter’s path you’ll find that you have a solid road map, and if you follow the course you’ll get to a good destination.  Step one: Be in Nashville and find your course. Step two: Stay the course.

8 Comments

  1. Pingback: » Andrew McGee: You Can’t Sell a Song in Nashville » photographs and thoughts photographs and thoughts

  2. Lou Pinto   July 23, 2012 10:49 pm / Reply

    thanks for the read…noted

    • andrewmcgee   July 23, 2012 11:10 pm / Reply

      Thanks for the feedback. I don’t claim to know everything, I’m just documenting my own journey. Best of luck on yours, Lou.

  3. Pingback: How To Make It In Nashville: « Andrew McGee

  4. Rich   July 27, 2013 1:45 pm / Reply

    Very realistic, thanks for taking the time to write this, good advice

  5. Joe Songwriter   October 4, 2013 1:59 pm / Reply

    Andrew speaks the truth. Having made the nashville journey several times, i think that is solid advice for the outsider. write from the heart, play for yourself. -Joe songwriter-

  6. Tina Williams   October 9, 2013 10:38 am / Reply

    “I’m sorry to burst your bubble but it’s very likely that your song just isn’t that good. ”

    I’m helping a friend move to Nashville next weekend
    he is braver than I. haha

    your blog/music is great

    kudos from buffalo NY

  7. msysteriou vanish   October 21, 2013 4:44 am / Reply

    I have some lyrics to sell

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*